Wednesday, 31 October 2007

'Top 8 Presidential Encounters of the Third Kind...'

Times journalist Daniel Finkelstein has compiled a list of eight former presidents, or current presidential candidates, all of whom have had encounters with UFOs. Some strange facts emerge: when the Ohio Democrat Dennis Kucinich saw what his friend Shirley MacLaine describes as 'a gigantic triangular craft', he 'felt a connection in his heart and heard directions in his mind.' It was a similar sighting that influenced Jimmy Carter to run for President, describing the phenomenon as 'a light beckoning me to run in the California primary.' Interestingly, both Carter and Ford promised to release the evidence on UFOs to the public, to little avail; the subject also exercised Bill Clinton. But the politician with the keenest fascination in ET was unquestionably Ronald Reagan, who became the first US President to publicly debate the logistics of an alien attack. (On at least three seperate occasions.) The most famous of these was in an address to the 42nd General Assembly of the United Nations on September 21, 1987, during which the former President mused: 'In our obsession with antagonisms of the moment, we often forget how much unites all the members of humanity. Perhaps we need some outside, universal threat to make us recognize this common bond. I occasionally think how quickly our differences worldwide would vanish if we were facing an alien threat from outside this world.'

http://timesonline.typepad.com/comment/2007/10/presidential-en.html

Tuesday, 30 October 2007

Times journalist calls for population control...

Eugenics and population control were the subject of a leading article in the Murdoch-owned Times of London yesterday. Calling for 'brave new thinking' on overpopulation, Melanie Reid urged feminists to embrace their inner dictator, and 'acknowledge that population control is a counter-intuitive thing.' Castigating the 'idealistic eyes' with which the argument is perceived, and calling for the West to transcend its 'liberal shibboleths', Reid believes overpopulation is the most pressing challenge confronting the planet.

'We can argue, quite lucidly, that population control equates not only to liberation for billions of women who spend their lives shackled by perpetual pregnancy but, even more portentously, that it represents liberation for the whole human race from starvation and disaster. It's what women choose when they have neither the wealth not the power to control their fertility in other ways, and to argue otherwise is to do so from a position of phoney idealism... It's time for creative thinking, by women for women. I rather admire the Chinese. They recognised a huge problem and did something about it... After nearly 30 years of it, Chinese women, who are increasingly working, now say the rules facilitate their more Westernised life.'

But lest we think that Ms Reid has disappeared into some parallel dimension in which Germany won the war, she reminds us that the 'global incentive scheme' which she has in mind would be discharged 'with all the proper safeguards' (!) and 'done with willing participation.' As willing, I suppose, as the Africans deliberately infected with AIDS by the World Health Organisation in 1977 were willing, or the gay population of New York and San Francisco, who- thanks to the hepatitis B vaccinations conducted by Dr Wolf Szmuness, an ex-roommate of Pope John Paul II- were infected with the same virus over a three year period from November 1978 to October 1981? International bodies don't have a very good record when it come to safeguarding the rights of their target populations- especially populations they wish to reduce in size... But perhaps this is just another 'liberal shibboleth' we need to adjust?

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/comment/columnists/melanie_reid/article2759369.ece

Sunday, 28 October 2007

Watson- Race Laureate

A letter to the Times today synchronises with yesterday's post (Alex Jones- Endgame) with almost eerie precision.

'It is surprising that in reporting the news of the recent comments on race by James Watson, former chancellor and director of Cold Spring Harbour Laboratory, that few have noted that its earlier claim to fame was as the centre of the eugenics movement. Dr Watson's comments on race, obesity and homosexuality would seem in line with those of an earlier, now discredited, directory of the laboratory, Charles Davenport, in the 1920s and 1930s. There must be something in the water.'

Professor Gillies McKenna
Radiation Oncology & Biology
Oxford University
Radiobiology Research Institute.

Saturday, 27 October 2007

Incriminating Evidence (Part Five)

'US President Bush and Soviet President Gorbachev arrived yesterday on this Mediterranean island for a summit conference beginning today during which both hope to start the search for a new world order.'

New York Times,
December 1, 1989.

http://the-daily-behemoth.blogspot.com/2006/12/incriminating-evidence-part-one.html
http://the-daily-behemoth.blogspot.com/2006/12/incriminating-evidence-part-two.html
http://the-daily-behemoth.blogspot.com/2006/12/incriminating-evidence-part-three.html
http://the-daily-behemoth.blogspot.com/2006/12/incriminating-evidence-part-three_24.html

Alex Jones: Endgame


Some days the New World Order seems a lot closer to our present reality than others. Today, waking up to the news that nurses are to be granted the power not to resuscitate patients who stop breathing- currently they may only do so after consultation with a doctor- was one of those days. It follows the news- as reported on Behemoth Conspiracy- of a planned liberalisation in the abortion laws, an expansion in the number of clinics offering the procedure, and to allow the second stage of a termination to be performed in the patient's home.

Alex Jones manages to draw together these and other themes presently being explored in the conspiracy blogosphere- in particular, those of 'transhumanism' and genetic research- in a particularly worthy section of his latest film, Endgame. Characteristically, Jones succeeds in penetrating the politically-correct obfuscation which cloaks discussion of these subjects, and in revealing the common agenda which underlies them all.

'The scientific rationale for tyranny has always been attractive to elites, because it creates a convenient excuse for treating their fellow man as lower than animals. Robert Thomas Malthus is famous for saying that a mass food collapse would be helpful because it would wipe out the poor... Malthus is important because his ideas led to the rise of a new scientific field that would dominate the course of human history for the next two hundred plus years.

'Charles Darwin, an admirer of the Malthusian Catastrophe model, developed the theory of evolution; its chief tenet being 'survival of the fittest.' With the help of T H Huxley, known as 'Darwin's Bulldog' for his strong support of Darwin's theories, his ideas were pushed into wide acceptance among key scientific circles throughout England and then the world. Darwin's cousin, Francis Galton, credited as the father of eugenics, saw an opportunity to advance mankind by taking the reins of Darwin's evolution theory and applied social principles, to develop Social Darwinism... The emerging pseudoscience was only codifying the practice of inbreeding, already popular within elites for millenia. Biometrics appears to be a new science but was actually developed by Galton back in the 1870s, as a way to track racial traits and genetic history, and as a way to decide who would be licensed to breed.

'In 1904 the Cold Springs Harbour Research Facility was started in the United States by eugenicist Charles Davenport with the funding of Carnegie, Rockefeller and Harriman. In 1907, the first sterilization laws were passed in the US. Citizens with mild deformities or low test scores on their report cards, were arrested and forcibly sterilized. In 1910, the US Eugenics Record Office was set up. By then the British had set up the first network of social workers, expressly to serve as the spies and enforcers of the eugenics race cult that was rapidly taking control of Western society. The social workers would decide who would have their children taken away, who would be sterilized, and in some cases, who would be quietly murdered. In 1911, the Rockefeller family exports eugenics to Germany by bankrolling the Kaiser Wilhem Institute which later would form a central pillar in the Third Reich... In 1923, [US eugenicist] Margaret Sanger wrote that black leaders would need to be recruited to act as front men for sterilization programmes directed against black communities.

'The so-called science was aggressively pushed through schools, churches and at state fairs. Churches competed in contests, with big cash prizes, to see who could best implement eugenics into their sermons... That same year in the United States [1924] more than 25 states passed forced sterilization laws, and the Supreme Court ruled in favour of brutal sterilization policies. When Hitler came to power in 1933, one of his first acts was to pass national eugenics laws modelled after laws in the United States. By 1936, Germany had become the world leader in eugenics, sterilizing and euthanizing hundreds of thousands of victims.

'At the end of the war, the Allies protected from prosecution the very Nazi scientists who had tortured thousands of people to death. The Nazi brand of eugenics had embarassed the elites, but they had no intention of stopping their plans... Eugenicists were angry that their great work had been exposed, and then scrambled to camoflauge their agenda. Eugenics Quarterly became Social Biology; the American Birth Control League became Planned Parenthood. New terms like 'transhumanism', population control, sustainability, conservationalism and environmentalism replaced racial hygiene and Social Darwinism. Many eugenicists of the previous period engaged in what they called 'crypto-eugenics', purposely taking their eugenics beliefs underground, becoming highly-respected anthropologists, biologists and geneticists in the post-war world.'

For the complete film, click here.

Thursday, 25 October 2007

Disney and Satanism

David Icke linked an interesting short video to his website yesterday: an excerpt from a sermon delivered by a Brazilian preacher on the subject of Disney and Satanism. A counter-intuitive combination, you might think... unless, of course, you've seen Steve Wilner's film on the subject of mind control, whose name temporarily escapes me and which seems to have been removed from his blog. (If anyone knows which of Steve's vids I'm referring to, please let me know and I'll put the link up.)

I've been interested in Disney and the conspiracy ever since investigating some of the urban myths about the movie 'The Little Mermaid' for an article I wrote last September. Pastor Josue Yrion reiterates the best known of these: the towering phallus with which a mischevious illustrator decided to personalise the movie's promotional artwork. (There's an article on the subject here.) He also mentions the subliminal message apparently embedded in 'Aladdin', audible only when the relevant frames are slowed down, which has the blue-skinned djinn commanding 'Good teenagers take off your clothes.'

Pocahontas, we learn, is an Indian word meaning 'Spirit invoked from the abyss', used to summon the power of the Devil. But his strongest words, as we might expect, are reserved for The Lion King: a favourite with the conspiracy crowd for reasons which we may well explore on another occasion. As well as boasting an allegedly effeminate lion- the brainchild of 'a homosexual film producer who later died of AIDS'- the film is allegedly scored by the arresting New Age music of Shirley McLaine; quite a claim considering Elton John's saccharine contributions are some of the best known in recent celluloid history. On the famous S-E-X subliminal, on the other hand, in the dust cloud formed as Simba collapses on the edge of a cliff for a nap, the pastor's sources seem a little more reliable.

The most interesting of his revelations, however, is the report written by one Dr James Dobson concerning a recent Mickey Mouse video. Its name, according to Dobson, is 'Growing up Gay' and contains exhortations to teenagers by a Disney spokesman to explore 'the wonderful world of homosexuality.' And as if this wasn't bad enough, Michael Eisner, the corporation's CEO at the time of the release, is claimed to have left his wife of long-standing for a man to whom he was subsequently married in a civil ceremony at Disneyworld, Florida.

Whether or not these claims are true, Disney's reputation as a conduit of conspiratorial weirdness would take several pages to fully explore. A good place to begin might be a recent article by fan favourite Miss Hoi Polloi, who discovered that an early investor in Disneyland was none other than Monsanto, the biotech company leading the world in the production of genetically-engineered seeds. The corporation sponsored several attractions at the resort's futurist attraction Tomorrowland: whose 1957 'House of the Future' has the dubious honour of being many people's first exposure to microwave ovens. The Tomorrowland logo, she notes, is the tau cross, used by the Sumerians to denote their proto-saviour Tammuz, and still popular with Freemasons. In fact, Disney's Masonic connections are numerous- a subject for another time- but best summarised in the name of the members-only restaurant in Disneyland's New Orleans Square: Club 33.

As an aside, those who have followed my articles on the 'disappearance' of Madeleine McCann may be interested to know that Alex Woolfall, the first of several PR specialists to be entrained to the case, was also the man hired by Monsanto during the storm over GM food; strange bedfellows indeed.


Wednesday, 24 October 2007

The Hole In The Sky


Behemoth Conspiracy is now the place for news clippings, but considering how neatly this particular story connects to Brian Allan's latest book I couldn't help but drop it in here:

'Royal Navy nuclear-powered submarines have been involved in more than 200 radiological incidents at the Devonport naval base in the past five years, according to details released to the Western Morning News under the Freedom of Information Act.'

(Brian, as you may recall, is the researcher whose work on Rosslyn Chapel I reviewed a while ago, and who was interviewed by Greg at Occult of Personality in May.) The news is unlikely to come as much as a surprise for those who live around the naval dockyard, because Devonport, in the south of England, like Taos in New Mexico, is notorious for 'The Hum': 'a faint but insistent hum... within the frequency range of 40 to 80Hz' whose cause is unknown. Says Brian:

'The cause... has often been attributed to the proximity of power lines, but another less obvious reason may be due to its geographical location and its proximity to a military establishment... Since military success and efficiency relies on good, secure communication, it is the method of supplying it that may lie at the core of the problem. Since salt water is a notoriously poor transfer medium for high frequency signals, communication with the submarine force whilst submerged is currently achieved using buried antennae transmitting at extra low frequency or ELF. The frequencies used are between 3-30Hz, which allows information transfer without the need for the vessel to surface...

'Unfortunately, since these specific frequencies are very close to those generated naturally within the human brain they may well be [the source] of these all-pervasive and irritating hums. It should be noted that some people are not sensitive to them, but for those who are, life can be a constant battle for their sanity... Worryingly, there have been a number of suicides around the area surrounding Devonport which were attributed to the hum and its pernicious effects. Interestingly, it has been recorded that persons suffering from 'hum sickness' have been afforded temporary relief when placed inside a Faraday cage, which filters out certain ranges of electromagnetic radiation... Unsurprisingly, the armed forces and government bodies like the National Radiological Protection Board continue with a policy of flat denial, insisting that there is no connection, far less any danger, from electromagnetic radiation, much as they do with the very real risks from microwave radiation stemming from the near ubiquitous use of mobile phones and other sources.'

He goes on to observe the frequency with which UFO sightings and other paranormal phenomena seem to coalesce around military bases, suggesting that the intense electromagnetism surrounding such places may be responsible for generating 'hotspots of anomalous activity... where the division between realities seems more transparent.' (The Hole In The Sky of the book's title.) One particularly interesting example is the Skinwalker Ranch in Utah, land once tended by the Navajo. According Brian Allan, the ranch played regular host to 'an array of orange coloured, glowing, visible portals that appeared spontaneously over the land... There are also reports of strange, small, airborne craft flying towards and vanishing into the openings.' The phenomena, of which both Linda Moulton-Howe and John B Alexander were amongst the witnesses, were attributed , in some quarters, 'to a curse cast by the indigenous Navajo... for trespassing on and desecrating their traditional ground', an idea which- as Allan observes- 'has strong resonances with the highly successful film, Poltergeist.' (Very interestingly, a 'Skinwalker' is a Native American word for shapeshifter.)

For those who have read the latest BTB article, the prevalence of portals associated with former American Indian sites begins to explain why Casolaro's obsession with the Octopus started at Cabazon; and why Joseph Smith's revelation of the Book of Mormon in 1830 was directly inspired by his imaginative contemplations of the Native American- perhaps megalithic- burial mounds of upstate New York... Not far from where the stargate would once again be wrenched open in 2001, at the real dawn of the millenium.


To buy Brian's book, visit: http://www.hiddenmysteries.com/xcart/home.php?cat=460



UPDATE: Native American magic has been blamed for the real-life 'Poltergeist curse' which urban mythology attributes to the film franchise of the same name; to which is attributed the early life of two of its child stars, Heather O'Rourke most famously. In a close parallel with the film's storyline, the curse has been blamed on real skeletal remains used as props, a claimed confirmed by actress JoBeth Williams in television interviews. Interestingly, another victim of the jinx has been the NBA team Utah Jazz, who play their home matches in an arena whose exterior was featured in a scene in Poltergeist III. The team have failed to win championships ever since, losing in the NBA Finals two years running in 1997 and 1998.

Friday, 19 October 2007

'Hail to the Lizard Queen...'


This morning's Today Programme on Radio Four included an intriguing interview with the author of a new book, The Secret History of the World. One Johnathan Black (Mark Booth) whose overarching thesis is that 'Everything is upside down, inside out and the other way around.' According to the publisher's blurb, 'At the heart of "The Secret History of the World" is the belief that we can reach an altered state of consciousness in which we can see things about the way the world works that are hidden from us in our everyday consciousness. This history shows that by using secret techniques, people such as Leonardo da Vinci, Isaac Newton and George Washington have worked themselves into this altered state - and been able to access supernatural levels of intelligence. It soon becomes evident that a secret philosophy is encoded in the world around us, in public buildings and monuments, in great art and literature, in the arrangement of the pips in an apple, in the names of the days of the week, even in the very stories we tell our children. '

The authoress Hilary Mantel penned an interesting review for The Guardian... Published, appropriately, on October 13. (Templar Day.) Criticising Black's tendency- real or imagined- to 'overestimate his capacity to surprise us', Mantel compares his relatively staid output with the uber-narratives of David Icke and others, remarking on the market saturation of 'great blockbusters stuffed with derivative nonsense.' Indeed, in this digital age: 'The internet has made every man his own occultist'- a line I couldn't help but chuckle at considering the proliferation (some might say excess) of 'synchro-mystical' blogs presently appearing at a rate of knots.

The rumours of my demise, on the other hand, have been greatly exaggerated... Indeed, as of tomorrow, I shall be inaugurating a third blog- specifically for the researchers out there- solely to collate the many news clippings and terrestrial developments that have been cluttering up this sacred space the last couple of months. This should permit us to concentrate here on the business I know so many of you have been clamouring to return to: deep space dissection of the weirdness that surrounds us. Joiners welcome.

http://books.guardian.co.uk/reviews/politicsphilosophyandsociety/0,,2189794,00.html