Monday, 2 February 2009

Joker at the End of the World (Part I)

The first part of this article is now up at BTB. (For anybody with problems gaining access to the site, I am aware of these and have asked Blogger to sort it.)

For a pass, please e-mail me. (A Googlemail or Blogger ID are required.)

Link.

2 comments:

Bumblebee said...

Hi there Ben

Been trying to access your Battling the Behemoth blog but not had any luck so far so hope you will invite me?

Here are a few strange connections I found when poking around on the net after reading your Joker at the End of the World post... (sorry it is so long)

I would think that the surname de Gelder would be of the same origins...

The surname of VAN GELDER is of German, Dutch and Jewish origin. It was a habitation name from the Northern German town of GELDERN, or from the Dutch province of GELDERLAND, earlier GELER and GELRE. Both places get their names from what may be an ancient description of marshland. It was also a German occupational name for a town crier, derived from the Old German word GELLER meaning to shout and yell. As a Jewish name it was applied as a nickname for a man with red-hair, from the Yiddish GEL (red-headed), or for a man with light hair and a sallow complexion.

link http://www.4crests.com/van-gelder-coat-of-arms.html

Then from Wikipedia...

William Thatcher, the lead character in the 2001 film A Knight's Tale played by Heath Ledger claimed to be Sir Ulrich von Liechtenstein from Gelderland so as to appear to be of noble birth and thus qualify to participate in jousting.

also...

Geldern

Coat of arms

The first coat of arms of the city of Geldern was a shield with three medlars, referring to an event in the dragon legend, see below. The lion of Guelders, recognizable in the present coat of arms, has been used since the Middle Ages.

History

Dragon legend

According to folk legend, local noblemen Wichard and Lupold of Pont fought a fire-breathing dragon around 878. They found it under a medlar tree, and one of them stabbed it with his spear. The dying dragon rattled two or three times: Gelre! Gelre!. In commemoration of this heroic feat, the Lords of Pont founded the city of Geldern at the confluence of the Niers and the Fleuth.

then on looking up 'medlar' on Wikipedia...

Medlar(Mespilus) is a genus of two species of flowering plants in the subfamily Maloideae of the family Rosaceae. ...so same family as Rowan, Hawthorn, Apple etc - all with 5 petalled flowers/pentagram sepals etc so associated with the Goddess except the Medlar 'is rotten before it is ripe' - the Dark Goddess?

Again from Wikipedia...

In literature

A fruit which is rotten before it is ripe, the medlar is used figuratively in literature as a symbol of prostitution or premature destitution. ~ followed by loads more..

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medlar
..including some choice words from Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet.

Also the medlar is self - pollinating

Back to Geldern..

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geldern

Religion

The population of Geldern is mostly Catholic. There are several Catholic churches, including the historically important parish church of Mary Magdalene at the market square.

The esoteric/occult symbolism just seems to go on and on with this horrible subject - there is stuff with more names ..and some 11's came up on a quick scan of some other info but to carry on looking was making me feel really uncomfortable as of course this was a truly TERRIBLE thing to happen :(

It's more than probable that you have already spotted most of this stuff yourself, your other readers too.. and maybe I have gone off on some tangents here? Just seems to be so much on the web about it, even some news/paper sites, it's quite terrifying actually :(

Best Regards

Kim

Ben Fairhall said...

Thank you Kim, excellent information.

You need to send me an e-mail so I can add your address to the invitation list.

It's bc.fairhall@gmail.com.

You have a Blogger ID so there should be no problem with access.




ATB
Ben